Sevendust

Din Productions Presents

Sevendust

Crobot

Friday, December 29, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Scout Bar

Houston, TX

$43-150

This event is all ages

Sevendust
Sevendust
You don't have to change everything. However, realigning can be the healthiest remedy after nearly two decades in the music business. Going into their eleventh full- length album, Kill The Flaw [7 Bros. Records/ADA Label Services], Sevendust changed a lot around them regarding the infrastructure of their organization, but they didn't alter what matters the most—the music. Following their first significant break (two months) since forming, the Atlanta group—Lajon Witherspoon [lead vocals], Clint lowery [lead guitar, backing vocals], John Connolly [rhythm guitar, backing vocals], Vince Hornsby [bass], and Morgan Rose [drums]—entered their new creative hub, Architekt Studios in Butler, New Jersey, completely inspired and invigorated.
"For the first time in our careers, the avenues were swept off with all of the trash we had on them before," admits Lajon. "We didn't have certain people's hands in our pockets or helicoptering the situation to what they thought it should be. We took a lot of things in our own control. As a result, it's a new chapter for us."
"That's why the record is called Kill The Flaw," explains Clint. "It's basically about cutting off the baggage from your life and career and trimming down the excess that holds you back. We've had a lot of struggles with the industry. We changed everything about our business. It's a rebirth in a sense, as far as what we want to do, how we're going to do it, and who we're going to it with. We've learned from our mistakes."
There were a few other significant changes as well. Instead of holding up in a hotel, Lajon, Clint, and John rented a house together. The sessions became "24-hour" as the guys cooked breakfast together, hit the gym, and then locked themselves in the studio until midnight every day for five weeks. They also penned the music alongside one another in the studio, jamming everything out in the same room.
"It made everything feel like it did when we first started," smiles Lajon. "We went in, sat down, looked at each other, picked up the instruments, and began rocking out. Recording like an actual group gave everything more substance."
"I wanted to embrace what Sevendust is," declares Clint. "It's the contrast of the melodic vocal over a very percussive, heavy musical landscape. That's what we've always done. That's one of those things our fan base really connected to. They're our life's blood.
There's no question. We allow our fans to have more of a voice than other bands. We love putting out records that people can say, 'This what they do. This is the type of band I want to support.'"
The first single and album opener "Thank You" upholds the pillars of their signature style with a buoyant guitar groove, bombastic drums, and soulfully striking refrain. "There's always someone trying to keep you down," sighs Lajon. "At the end of the day, that negativity makes you stronger. You're still going. It says, 'Thank you for putting me down. Thank you for making me work harder. Thank you for hating!'"
Meanwhile, "Death Dance" builds from an eerie clean guitar into a towering distorted verse that's as robust as it is raw. Everything converges on an undeniable vocal chant during the chorus. "That's the summer dance jam right there," chuckles Lajon.
"It's based around the social media era we're in with all of its vanity and ego," reveals Clint. "We all get caught up in it. People try to enhance their looks without putting any energy towards giving back. The dead are society staring at their iPhones. You've got to see the world. You can't look at a screen for that."
Then, there's "Not Today," which is equally stirring and soaring with its six-string beatdown and vulnerably vibrant vocals. "That's another one about change," continues Clint. "It's us as a band basically making a choice to change who we work with and how we do what we do. It's us addressing things that have stopped that from happening. You're lashing out at someone and explaining how you're going to be a different version of yourself."
Thankfully, they're still Sevendust through and through, and that's what forged one of hard rock's most diehard audiences. 2014's acoustic offering Time Traveler's & Bonfires saw an overwhelming response from that community, being quickly funded through a highly successful PledgeMusic campaign. Just a year prior, Black Out The Sun entered Billboard's Top Hard Music Albums chart at #1 and landed at #18 on the Top 200. They kicked off their illustrious career with an untouchable string of three gold albums, beginning with their self-titled 1997 debut and continuing with Home in 1999 and Animosity in 2001. Along the way, they've sold out shows everywhere and given unforgettable performances at the likes of Rock On The Range, Woodstock, OZZfest, and Shiprocked! to name a few. However, the new chapter starts now.
"I hope people know we're the real deal," concludes Lajon. "That's the most important thing. There's substance here. That's why everybody keeps coming back, and we're beyond thankful for that."
"I want everybody to walk away surprised," Clint leaves off. "I hope it's better than they imagined, and they get this reassurance that we're all connected. We want to give people fresh, quality music. I hope they feel prideful they've stuck with us through all of these years." — Rick Florino, July 2015
Crobot
Crobot
Dirty. Groove. Rock.

There was a time when rock radio was dominated by great riffs. From Deep Purple's "Smoke On the Water" and Derek And The Dominoes' "Layla" to Soundgarden's "Black Hole Sun" and Rage Against The Machine's "Killing In The Name Of" it was all about that unmistakable guitar sound that instantly identified a band or song.

The four members of Crobot — Brandon Yeagley (lead vocals), Chris Bishop (guitar), Jake Figueroa (bass) and Paul Figueroa (drums) — have united to bring that back.

Blending funk, blues, metal and good old-fashioned rock and roll into a howling vortex of Yeagley's vocals, Bishop's guitar and the Figueroa's backbone, Crobot have crafted an album of endless good time rock hooks that sound as inspired today as they would have on AOR radio in 1974.

"We grew up with the same riff rock and it's seemingly lacking in today's music. We really seem to like the rock of old and felt that was missing," Yeagley says.

"It seems like once we started jamming we didn't try to find a certain sound or didn't try to write a certain style, that's just the stuff that came out cause that's the shit that we like, the stuff that we listen to. It was much more of a subconscious effort. Crobot defined itself," Jake adds.

That seamless chemistry between the quartet is evident throughout their eponymous four-song EP, which serves as an introduction to the band's upcoming Something Supernatural album, due out this October. Before getting to the, well, mystical bond, first a little back story: Yeagley and Bishop were playing together in Crobot with two other members, while Jake and Paul were in other bands. "We played shows together and we realized we wanted Jake and Paul in the band for it to work and we got them," Bishop says. "Just jamming together it was natural and clicked right off the bat. With Jake and Paul we were on the same train going the same direction, from the beginning."

With the Figueroa brothers in the fold, Crobot found its voice. "Once Jake and Paul came into the band a little over a year ago everything started coming a lot easier just because they were already in a band that was similar to Crobot," Bishop says. "We all played on shows together so it was nice to have an idea and then someone to expand off of that idea. So once that started happening we realized, 'This is what Crobot is.'"

Crobot is a band that can rock at all tempos. Whether it's the slow-building groove of "Skull Of Geronimo," a methodical sludge-rocker that calls to mind Soundgarden in the chorus or the more up-tempo funkified "Nowhere To Hide," a track that sounds like the Black Crowes driving a Camaro, Crobot display stellar musicianship and lyrical depth.

For example, on "Queen Of The Light," the powerful closing track of Something Supernatural, Yeagley sings the story of a girl yearning for a new life. "She lives the darkest life/but all she wants to be is the queen of the light," he sings against the plaintive wailing of the slow-moving melody. It's one of the songs destined to strike a deep chord with fans in the same way the single "Nowhere To Hide" has become a good-time anthem.

"'Nowhere To Hide,' was another one of the first songs we had written. We were jamming ideas and pulling ideas from other songs that we had jammed on and it came together," Paul says. "It was organic."

"Nowhere To Hide" is one of the songs Yeagley cites as getting his feet wiggling. And he promises that on Something Supernatural there will be plenty more grooves to get fans moving, as those who've experienced Crobot live have already seen.

"'Night Of The Sacrifice' is one that's coming out off the full length and that always gets me excited to play," he says. "It's usually the introduction to the funkier side of what we do in our set, it's usually the first funky track that we play. So it's really exciting to switch that mode from more riff based stuff towards to the classic metal sounding stuff with the heavier side of things and to flip flop and see people's reactions when we totally hit the other end of the spectrum with the funky stuff."

Musically, "Skull Of Geronimo" is one Yeagley sees as being undeniably representative of Crobot. "That's a little on the heavier end of the spectrum, but it's still got that funkiness to it," he says. And lyrically, "Wizards" might be the Crobot statement song.

"It's an epic tale of two wizards. One is on the side of wizardry and technology while the other is the side of natural spiritual wizardry and it's a clash of funkiness and classic metal too in the same sense. So it's a battle of epic proportions on all sides," he says. "It's just a song that fulfills all the ends of the spectrum of what Crobot is."

Then there is the storytelling ability they show on a song like "La Mano De Lucifer," a Biblical tale that starts off, "A failed rebellion/against the one creator/exiled to the fire."

To show all sides of Crobot takes a lot. This is a band that displays their pot-smoking proudly, like on the humorous Twitter post, "Warning, Crobot's music has been known to turn you to stoned."

As another side of the band, Yeagley is a devout sci-fi buff. Asked what one film Crobot does the score for, he replies without hesitation, "2001: A Space Odyssey. That movie has its own special place amongst the sci-fi world." And for contemporary sci-fi he picks Ender's Game. "I'm such a huge fan of that series and to see that come to life on film was really cool. It's got battles of epic proportions and everything you love about sci-fi, just nails it," he says.

In a recent interview with a popular Chicago website the band was asked about the four-song CROBOT EP first, then waiting on the album. Their response: "We are gentlemen so we wanted to ease the tip in first."

And asked if they were born in the wrong era musically Jake nailed it. "I thought about it but then I realized the weed is WAYYYY better now."

A modern rock band with a sense of humor, as well as their own hot sauce, CROBOT has already been making their mark among peers with their wild live performances. But for Crobot, at the end of the day, it is all about the sound.

"All I care about is that people walk away after hearing the album thinking, 'Man, Crobot is the funkiest, heaviest band I've ever heard,'" Bishop says.

Mission accomplished.

For fans of Clutch, Wolfmother, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Rage Against the Machine, or Soundgarden, and if ten more bands that influenced Crobot's sound were needed to be named, they easily could be.

The powerful packed punch of the vocals of lead singer Brandon Yeagley is a great one-two with the spellbinding, head bobbing guitar riffs of Chris Bishop; not to mention the stellar solidity of the low frequencies of Jake Figueroa on bass guitar and brother Paul Figueroa with groovy sticks of fury. Bishop brings his unique style of art to the table to add images to the stories unveiled by lyricist and frontman Brandon Yeagley. The two also plan on creating a graphic novel based on the songs from the album, set for an undetermined future release.

Crobot have spilled their sweat and tones on such stages as Philadelphia's Theater of Living Arts and Xfinity LIVE, The Paramount in Huntington, NJ, the Stanhope House in Stanhope, New Jersey, and Anchorage, Alaska's Chilkoot Charlie's and plan on embarking on a tour not limited to the venues listed previously.
Venue Information:
Scout Bar
18307 Egret Bay Blvd
Houston, TX, 77058
http://scoutbar.com/2012/