Bad Wolves

DIN Productions Present

Bad Wolves

From Ashes to New, Diamante

Monday, July 2, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Jake's Backroom

Lubbock, TX

$20.00 - $95.00

This event is all ages

The FROM ASHES TO NEW VIP packages can be [purchased here:

Diamond ans Platinum

Bad Wolves
Bad Wolves
Bad Wolves aren’t just a band, they’re a sonic wrecking ball that’s destroying everything in their path. The act—which is composed of drummer John Boecklin (ex-Devildriver), vocalist Tommy Vext (Divine Heresy, Snot) as well as guitarists Doc Coyle (ex-God Forbid), Chris Cain (Bury Your Dead) and bassist Kyle Konkiel (ex-In This Moment), may seem like they just exploded onto the scene, but the idea has been percolating in Boecklin and Vext’s heads since 2015. “When I heard the initial batch of songs I was really impressed because what John was doing was very creatively experimental and it gave me an opportunity to also do more vocally experimental things,” Vext explains.The result is of this joint effort is Disobey, an album that music fans have been clamoring for and that has already birthed a viral single via their impassioned (and seemingly ubiquitous) cover of the Cranberries’ 1993 protest song, “Zombie,” which has racked up over 33 million views over Facebook and YouTube, hit #1 on Spotify's viral chart in over 40 countries countries and gone to #1 on the iTunes songs chart.
Recorded at various studios spanning three states and producers—including Kane Churko (Ozzy Osbourne, Papa Roach) who mixed “Remember When” and “Zombie”—Disobey is a collection of songs that sees this group of Los Angeles music veterans stretching out and exploring sonic space they’ve never veered into in the past. “Everything seemed very natural once we decided that we wanted to be in a band that featured more singing than screaming,” Boecklin explains. “There are some very different songs on this record from track to track, from almost ballad stuff to heavier-edged material; we really spread our wings and had no problem tearing down any walls when it came to stylistic traits,” he continues, adding that Vext helped take this varied collection of tracks to the next level. “I think Tommy's performances on this album have blown away everyone who’s heard it. He has the songs that allow him to showcase what a powerful performer he is and we really harnessed that here.”
From driving anthems like “No Masters” to the syncopated Faith No More-worthy rocker “Better The Devil,” the crushing power of “Learn To Live,” and the soaring ballad “Hear Me Now,” Disobey is an album that showcases elements of rock, metal, hip-hop and progressive rock into a instantly infectious amalgam of music that’s as infectious as it is groundbreaking. Then there’s the band’s aforementioned cover of “Zombie,” which has hit the top of the charts on iTunes and Shazam and already garnered seven million total streams, an almost unheard of accomplishment for a band like Bad Wolves. “Recording ‘Zombie’ was Tommy’s idea and he really hit it out of the park,” Boecklin recalls. “When we finished recording it we sent it to [Cranberries singer] Dolores O’Riordan and she loved it and was supposed to record vocals on the version the day that she passed away,” he continues. “The fact that the song has gone so viral is completely unexpected and the success is bittersweet.” Subsequently, the band decided to give all of the proceeds from their reimagined cover of the nineties hit to O’Riordan’s three children.
In the spirit of protest songs like “Zombie,” Disobey is teeming with lyrics that see Vext tackling everything from the currentpolitical state of our nation to the prevalence of racism, not the typical fodder for an album that's already birthing hit singles. “This album is a commentary, but it’s also a diary,” he explains—and that’s especially evident on the painfully personal ballad, ‘Remember When.’ “I have a twin brother who is serving 17 years in prison because he attempted to murder me in 2010 during a home invasion,” Vext explains. “I've never gotten so vulnerable in songwriting before and talked about this situation, but itjust felt natural on this album. No one broke my heart more than my own brother and nothing breaks my heart more than knowing he’s a danger to others and himself.” In the wake of this incident Vext, who has been sober for nine years, became a sober companion and coach in order to save others from similar fates. “There’s a lot of deep meaning in that song for me and I didn’t go into writing those lyrics with a conscious thought, I just heard the riff and all of these emotions poured out of me that I’d been keeping inside for a long time.”
That catharsis is ultimately what lies at the core of Disobey. “I listen to Meshuggah, but I also listen to Lana Del Rey and Busta Rhymes, not that we would be touring with those bands,” Vext says. “But I think we have a sound that kind of vacillates between extreme music and hard rock, which could be dubbed ‘commercial’ and I don’t think that’s a bad thing, I think it’s a strength of ours.” Additionally, the members of Bad Wolves all come from touring bands so they’re excited to get out on the road and bring these songs to audiences live who have been waiting for an album like Disobeyfor a long, long time. “This is the greatest body of work I’ve ever participated in over the course of 20 years of making music,” Vext summarizes. “It’s also the most creative and honest thing that I’ve ever worked on and we can’t wait for people to be able to hear these songs and share them with us live. Because there really are no limitations to what the five of us can accomplish with this band.”
From Ashes to New
From Ashes to New
Lancaster, Pennsylvania is the sort of town of which there are many hundred all across America: post-industrial, blue collar and, on occasion, more than a little bleak. As is so often the case though, it is in these relative backwards towns that authentic, compelling creativity truly thrives - the monotony of the landscape punctuated by brilliant flares of art. FROM ASHES TO NEW are one such flare; a thoroughly modern rock band wielding both a state-of-the-art sound and an old-as-the-hills work ethic.

Formed barely two years ago by vocalist, programmer and creative mastermind Matt Brandyberry, the sextet consists of the cream of Lancaster's underground scene. "We have all played with each other in old bands and other projects," explains Brandyberry. "And when those things stalled or fell apart, the guys who wanted to take things a little more seriously began to gravitate toward FATN. It all came together incredibly organically and we clicked almost instantaneously. It was a real 'Aha!' moment, like this was the band we should have been in all along."

For Brandyberry in particular, FATN represents a creative endeavor a long time in the making. As a young kid obsessed by world-changing flows of Tupac and Biggie as well as the local Philadelphia Hip Hop scene that surrounded him, writing rhymes became a natural pastime. "It was until my late teens that my interest in hard rock music properly developed," explains the frontman "slowly but surely I got into things like Sevendust and it all snowballed from there."

Before long, Brandyberry was obsessively playing guitar and piano and, most importantly, penning his own music to go with the raps he had been developing since junior high. "I decided I was going to put everything I had inside of me into doing music, it became everything to me. I was like a sponge - I wanted to learn every technique, every skill so that I had what I needed to out the ideas that I had in my head on paper and eventually turn them into records."

And turn those ideas into records is exactly what he did. With the assistance of producer Grant McFarland, FATN set about molding their rap/rock hybrid into a sky-scrapingly monolithic proposition.

"We always wanted our songs to sound huge," admits co-vocalist and melodic linchpin Chris Musser. "Our ambition is to throw as much as we can into them and give the listener the most connecting experience possible. We vent a lot of emotion, a lot of frustrations, a lot of angst through our songs, but we always want them to have a craft to them - something which shines through."

And if recent four-track EP Downfall was a glistening opening gambit, then the forthcoming full-length album will radiate with the fire of a thousand suns. A fearsome mix of contemporary metalcore crunch and soul-searching rap, the band are already punching with a heavyweight strength that belies their so far brief career. It's a potent approach galvanized further by the background from which the band all come from.

"When we were recording the album, we were all holding down full time jobs," explains Musser. "I work fixing up body panels for airplanes. I'd start work at 6, finish at 4 then go straight to the studio to work until 2 in the morning. That has been my life for the past year and the discontentment of working in a dead-end job has filtered through onto this album massively. We go through the same things that everyone else who has to wake up in the morning and go do something they hate."

"To put it bluntly, there's a lot of 'Fuck you' on this album," laughs Brandyberry. "A lot of stuff about shitty relationships, about working hard for something and people telling you can't do it, about never accepting that things are just 'beyond you'. We're not the cool band from LA or New York or any of those places, we're six regular guys from a regular place but that is in our favor, not against us. We understand what it's like."

Yet with major tours with the likes of Hollywood Undead under their belts,and a record deal that puts them among some of the best known commercial rock bands already signed, FATN look set to take their message to a bigger stage than they could ever previously have imagined.

Blessed with honesty, integrity, grit, determination and, most vitally, a genuinely devastating arsenal of gut-mangling tunes – FROM ASHES TO NEW have got all the ingredients to turn your world, and the entire scene, on its head.
Diamante
Diamante
Born in Manhattan, Diamante first started out Acting and had a small part in a play at the Nueyorican Poets Café when she was only 9 years old. The producer asked her grandmother if she could sing and she told him honestly that she did not know. Well, Diamante sang her little heart out and the producer said that she had a voice and should take voice classes. Then she came out in another play, to which she had to sing and has been singing ever since.
Venue Information:
Jake's Backroom
5025 50th St #A
Lubbock, TX, 79414
http://www.jakes-sportscafe.com/